Tag Archives: drugs

Self-care

There are some terms that you simply cannot help but chuckle when you hear them. Innocent terms like ‘pulled pork’, or common phrases like ‘polishing the Kaiser’s helmet’ contain sublimated double entendres which the brain cannot ignore.  Such is the case with the term ‘self-care’. In fact the first few times I heard the term, I thought the person saying it was literally referring to the onanistic arts without even the smokescreen of a euphemism.  Of course, self-care is only partly about rubbing one off, and or out.

In order to understand the full girth of what self-care is, we must first take a look at where it came from.  Millennials, defined by science as the generation born after drugs became harmful and before computers became cool, are the tallest generation in history.  With all this height comes a lot of stress.  Millennials are thus, not only the tallest generation they are also the most anxious.

Unlike their parents, millennials are raised to see their towering stature as a ‘privilege’ which is why you don’t ever hear millennials complain. So, where as their parents’ generation might have used complaining, alongside ‘buying rental properties’ and ‘The Beatles’ as an outlet to relieve stress, Millennials prefer other outlets.

These outlets might include ‘making short and pointless ‘Vines”, ‘growing a beard’, or ‘talking about being a vegan’.  Stress relief might also might involve doing little things for one’s self that makes one’s day a little bit brighter and thus releases a little of that pent up tension.

Drinking and taking drugs

IMG_1290[1]

Beer.

The most common form of self-care is still ‘getting wasted by yourself.’  Alcohol is probably the most convenient and accessible way to do this, but pretty much any intoxicating substance will do.  As long as said intoxicant moves you from the state of ‘being anxious and/or stressed’ to the state of ‘closing off, or befuddling, the parts of the brain which generate these responses to the point where the brain no longer remembers to be anxious and/or stressed’ it will enable you to do self-care.

I like to incorporate drinking into other activities to enhance the self-care capabilities of alcohol, so I sit in the dark sending cryptic text messages to people.   The sensory deprivation of the darkness, the intoxicating effects of the alcohol, and the delicate mental gymnastics of coming up with bizarre non sequiturs to text to people is like a massage for the soul.

Now, I know what you’re saying “But doesn’t this encourage dangerous behaviour?”

To this I answer: “yes”

I also hear you saying, this time in a silly high-pitched whinny: “But I get high on life”.  Well my answer to this is “No you don’t; that’s not a thing.”

So go ahead and sooth your soul and expand your mind. Expand it so widely that it expands all the way out your mouth and all over the table in KFC.

Irritating people

They say that a trouble shared is a trouble halved. Well, the same Dearest Reader, applies to anxiety and irritation.  What you’ll find is, if you are feeling a bit annoyed yourself, annoying someone will make you feel a bit better and annoying everyone will make you feel great.

Irritating people is actually very easy.  This is because most people have very thin-skins and are basically powder-kegs of explosive rage. This of course, makes it all the more fun.  The best kind of ‘irritating people’ is the sort where it isn’t instantly obvious that it is intentional.  This way, people can’t rage at you and must simply turn the rage in on themselves, seething until they develop an ulcer.  This is the best outcome because no-one punches you.

Try ‘whistling tunelessly’ – whistling is basically the most casually irritating thing you can do without props.

Try ‘making clicking sounds with your tongue on the bus’

If you live in a flat with somewhat priggish house-mates, try ‘going to the toilet with the door open’.

You could even try ‘replying to everything someone says with “really?” but in a funny voice so the person you are speaking to can’t quite work out if you’re mocking them or not’.

Twitter

We’ve already talked about masturbation, but there is actually more than one way to ‘grease the family pig’. Obviously, sexually gratifying oneself manually is a good time and all, but what about the Choking the Chicken…of the mind?

We have discussed Twitter, or ‘cheep-cheep’ as it is often known, in a previous weblog bulletin but not in depth and we didn’t discuss strategies for using it.

Rather than using Twitter to read about important things babyboomers are doing, or keeping abreast of the latest pop music, Millennials seldom look at the ‘timeline’ area of Twitter at all; instead they simply stare at their own profiles while posting things as they come to mind.    This release acts as a type of self-care in both the double and single entendre senses of the term.  These are the three main ways to use Twitter for self care:

Non-specifically Positive Tweets referring to real, imagined or anticipated but equally non-specific achievements. Such as finding a sex partner or swimming with dolphins

Non-specifically Positive Tweets referring to real, imagined or anticipated but equally non-specific achievements. Such as finding a sex partner or swimming with dolphins

Equally non-specific vague and cryptic Tweets designed to hint at menace but not really . Designed to make real or imagined enemies or people who corrected your grammar ask "was it something *I* did?"

Equally non-specific vague and cryptic Tweets designed to hint at menace but not really . Designed to make real or imagined enemies or people who corrected your grammar ask “was it something *I* did?”

Tweets telling everyone still up that you are going to quit Twitter. You have better things to do. Etc. And you'll really do it this time.

Tweets telling everyone still up that you are going to quit Twitter. You have better things to do. Etc. And you’ll really do it this time.

Go to the gym

It’s 4AM, everything is shut, but there’s a vending machine at the gym.  They have those weird biscuits you like. Well, you don’t like them per se, but you will eat them.

 

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Social media

Social media is important.  Quite often you’ll be at a meeting and someone will say “blah, blah, blah social media presence” or “Blah blah, blah, stop arsing about on Facebook we are discussing pivot tables!”

If you don’t understand social media all that conversation will sound like to you is “blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah” and you’ll look like an idiot, even though you are wearing a tie or a nice dress.

But what is social media? Well, it’s similar to computers, which we discussed way back in the mists of time. But it’s not computers. Social media is on computers but it is also on your phone. Whereas computers are on desks and some people take them on the bus, computers aren’t on phones.  It is like the media, but whereas the regular media is on the telly or the newspaper or jostling politicians, social media isn’t on any of those things.  It’s on computers and phones.

I can see you are getting confused.  This is because it is confusing. Then so is knowing what to do with a hot-air balloon and we covered on this weblog. So stay focused because your weblog author is, what the trendy kids say ‘A social media kaiser’.

Learn what the things of social media are and get them.

Social media isn’t actually a thing. You can’t walk into a shop, even a flash one or a technology one, and ask for “one social media please”. You’ll get punched, or at very least sneered at derisively because you are clearly not up with the play about the fact that social media is actually a high level name for Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, Friendster, Twitter and Google +. You have to ask for those things if you want to ask for some social medias. Don’t be an idiot.

Learn the lingo.

In the spirit of the age I used the term ‘lingo’ instead of ‘language’ or ‘vernacular’.  In the twenty-first century and to a lesser extent the twentieth and the nineteenth, buzz-words are the new knowledge and language.  Social media is full of buzz-words and slang. Saying ‘social media’ itself is a bit ‘square’ – you should call it ‘social meeds’ or ‘s-meeds’ even.  There are literally trilliosn of slang terms and buzzwords in s-meeds but here are the main ones:

Twitter – ‘Twitts’, ‘T-wit’, ‘the Blue Bird of talking’, ‘140 yo’ and ‘cheep-cheep’

Facebook – ‘Facies’ (never call it ‘Facetime’ however, that is another computer thing) ‘F-Bomb’ ‘The Blue Monkey’, ‘Winklevosses Lament’ and ‘FaceMethamphatamine’

Google + – You never have to talk about Google +

LOL – is something you add to insulting statements to passive-aggressively make a person think you were joking

: ) – shows the social media viewer you are a moron or temporary incapacitated

ROFL-copter – is pretty much what it sounds like it is.

Attract acquaintances

The currency of social media is people looking at the stuff you post. The more people doing that, the more social media important you become. In order to get people to look at your social medias on the regular you need them to ‘like’, ‘follow’, ‘friend’ or ‘engorge’ you on one or more of the social media platforms.

“What’s the best way to do this?” hear you ask yourself, shielding your face from view with a manila folder?

Well, I’ll tell you.

Say inflammatory things

The best way to get attention is to say something offensive. It is best because it is far and away the easiest. Being inflammatory actually works best when there is little to no basis to what you are saying because there is no chance anyone else will come along and agree with you and make your point better than you did.

This is why you would say “Adam roots fruit” rather than “I don’t really like Adam’s reductive views on the causes of the Great Depression” – the first point is shorter, catchier and in no way in need of qualification. The latter is longer and probably needs to be explained.

Politics and Religion

Much like saying inflammatory things, making statements on social meeds about politics and religion are polarising, get people’s attention, need little to no qualification and have the added benefit, just by virtue of your venturing an opinion, of sounding clever.

“The thing about the left is they tend to take an over simplified view of the economic mechanisms behind a sophisticated modern economy”

That statement up there, sounds very clever. But get this: I MADE IT UP OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD. It took LITERALLY three seconds. It took actually longer to TYPE than to think!

“The Republicans have been sliding towards an Armageddon of polarisation since, well, for a generation”

Ditto.

Very personal shares

Sharing way too much of yourself is to social media what car/pug/Hitler pictures are to the internet at large – the ultimate milkshake that brings the sympathy boys and/or girls to the emotional yard.

At its heart social media is about you; your foot-print on the internet. No-one wants to see the self-satisfied, neatly-cobbled brogue-print of shit-togetherness: boooooring!

People want the rubbed red raw barefoot of dysfunction. The break-up, the drunken arse picture, the long diatribe about how no-one respects you at work. How hard university is. That is the stuff of social media legend!

Bragging

Social media however, is a polarised place. On the one hand, no-one wants to know how great your day at work was and how much you love your colleagues; they want to know how much smarter you are than the idiots you work with, how much your job is beneath you, and how much you ate a spider by accident. On the other hand, however, they also want to know about how much better your life is than theirs is. Self-satisfaction is a snore, but self-aggrandisement is a loud, cocaine-lobster-bisque-and-Congac-fuelled cheer.

Flash holidays, photos with celebrities, jewellery, animals you’ve shot, performance cars you don’t actually own, or bags of drugs. Talk about your sexual conquests in great and licentious detail. Always, repeat, always brag about how much you drunk and never, ever talk about being home on a Friday or inside on a day deemed sunny enough to be outside.

So, that is basically it for s-meeds. Go forth and function.

Dinner parties: spare a thought

Dinner parties can be either a pleasant evening with friends or a grinding obligatory chore which makes death seems like sweet release.  While this can have a lot to do with how much you like your friends or what your threshold for ‘pleasant’ is, a good deal of it has to do with dietary requirements.

For many of us afflicted with allergies, have health issues that restrict what we can and can’t eat, or hold cultural views that dictate our food choices, social dining can be a minefield of awkwardness.  Even amongst our friends and loved ones, our health issues, or ethical or cultural choices can feel like millstones around our necks or walls dividing us from the ‘fun’ of all being together.

Now, while health, cultural and ethical issues surrounding food can make dining out difficult, imagine if you found yourself in a far worse situation than this. Imagine if it wasn’t just real health concerns that stopped you eating something.  What if it wasn’t dedication to a belief.  What if it wasn’t just one thing that you couldn’t eat; what if it was most things.

Kale salad

Kale fig and halloumi salad: How is that normal?

What if your reasoning for not eating those things wasn’t all that robust or socially acceptable.  What if you didn’t like most food because you thought it was gross, you were unadventurous, and there was never enough salt on it.

Now you know my pain dear Weblog readers.

I can’t remember the all the times I’ve had to blow off a brunch and sit at home drinking because “there’s always spinach, and that café is pretty expensive for what is basically an omelette”.  I have a hard time counting the number of occasions I’ve had to pick unidentifiable lentils or raisins out of something I was told, in no uncertain terms before I agreed to come I might add, would be a normal curry.

You probably don’t know how hard it is to show up at your best friend’s house, look them or their significant other, in the eye and say “That looks disgusting, I’m not eating that slop.”

While it may be hard for those with health concerns and those who make informed and ethical decisions about what they will eat, it is much harder for those of us who just think most food is ‘pretentious and ick’.

To make matters worse, the stress of potentially having to yams, broccoli, or kale, means it is all too easy to drink alcohol or take drugs before going to a dinner party. Some people will even mistake awkwardness, or even shame, for ‘drunkenly insulting the host and disappearing to the toilet with a bottle of wine.’

Sometimes it pays to be aware that one person’s ‘rude, drunk and arrogant behaviour’ is another person’s ‘just wanting some chips’.  What you might see as ‘returning from the toilet then demanding to dance to The Libertines first record even though its not really that sort of party’ is another person’s ‘wanting to participate.’

Just think. Okay.

 

 

Working hard

IMG_1049[1]Since the 1980s it has been widely accepted that being a hard worker is a virtuous trait. It shows you can be relied on, that you’ll pull your weight and you’ll do your share.

Assuming your name is Phillipa, people will say “Phillipa is a GOOD hard worker. She’s an asset to the team and she always signs for courier packages because she’s always in the office and doesn’t whinge about it, even if they are heavy and clearly nothing to do with work and someone is just getting all their packages couriered to work because its easier.”

Hard work makes you GOOD.

Like a lot of things that are good though, working hard isn’t much fun.  For a start, working hard isn’t usually compatible with the things that people commonly associate with fun: drinking, taking drugs or properly listening to Slowdive records. Working hard isn’t even as much fun as the other sorts of working: ‘working slowly’, ‘working ineptly’, or ‘looking like you are working but you are really just sitting on news websites posting racist comments’.

Working hard actively involves things usually associated with a pretty rubbish time: silently focusing, lifting, spreadsheets, not dancing, and holding in farts because it’s quiet.

it is hardly surprising then, that since 1984 people have been looking for a way to look like they are working hard, so as to receive the credit and accolades, but not actually be working hard at all, so as to continue enjoying themselves.

The problem is, most of the old favourites like “Leaving your jacket over the back of your chair so it looks like you are at work when really you are at the taco shop” and “Going into work on a Sunday to send an email to someone and then leaving” are a bit played out.  Most people see a jacket over the back of a chair nowadays and they think ‘taco shop’.  You send an email from work on a Sunday you are probably more likely to get a “I told you you aren’t allowed to sleep in the office anymore, get an actual flat” response as you are a “You’re working hard, have some stock options” response.   You need to be more original. You idiot.

Always wear work clothes

If you are always at work, you pretty much would only ever need to wear ‘work clothes.’ The fact you never change out of them indicates how little time you have to change. Because you are working.

There are some issues with this as a sole strategy: if you work and a rendering plant you are going to find the smell of your over-alls socially debilitating. Conversely, if you work in an office people might not think you are wearing a suit on a Saturday because you are on your way to the office; they may just think you are the sort of berk that gets up on a Saturday and puts on a suit because they think it makes them look like Don Draper.

Asinine idioms

Candle

A candle: Burning at one end. You burn the candle at both ends.

People who work hard don’t have time to be original or interesting and this reflects in their patterns of speech.  People who work hard talk in silly idioms and dumb sayings because the main part of their brain is thinking about spreadsheets and how to build a garage. These idioms should also usually nod towards the strain of having to work hard.

Try peppering your speech with: “Another day, another dollar”, “Working hard or hardly working?” “Burning the ol’ midnight oil” or “doing more working than twerking these days.”

Humble brags

Asinine idioms are all well and good but occasionally you will have to engage in more specific conversation. All conversation has to have something to do with work, how hard you are working, and relating the trials and tribulations in your life back to work. For instance:

“I am such a bad girlfriend; when the fridge fell on Dustin he had to drive himself to the emergency room because I was in the office burning the ol’ midnight oil.”

or:

“I have been so slack at the gym since the one in the basement of MY OFFICE stopped being open TWENTY-FOUR HOURS A DAY.”

Or even:

“I didn’t come to your daughter’s Christening because I was digging a pool.”

Get a nickname

All hard-working people have nicknames related to their jobs because their job is most of their identity.  You can stand around waiting for someone to give you a nickname, sure, but if you aren’t a hard working person you might end up with a nickname that refers to non-work related aspect of your life. You might, for instance, end up being called “Munty Jim”, Mindy Car-crash” or ‘Phil the Screamer’.

Desk

The desk that Major Desk took his nickname from. Because he’s always sitting at it. Working.

No, you will have to give yourself a nickname to control what it is, and make sure it refers to your work. Try ‘Danny Spreadsheet’, ‘Water-cooler Joan’, ‘Sally Leaf-blower’ or ‘Major Desk’.

LinkedIn

Until 2009 hard working people didn’t use online social media tools unless their job was specifically ‘social media expert’ (which isn’t a real job), ‘professional networker’ (a function of all jobs but not one in and of itself) or ‘Mark Zuckerburg.’  This was evidenced by the number of boring people who used to say ‘I don’t have time for Facebook’ or ‘Twitter? I hear enough twittering around here thank you very much.  Pass me that toner cartridge please.  No, not that one, the other one.”

Then along came LinkedIn.

LinkedIn is a social media tool for people who work hard.  If Facebook is approaching someone at a party and saying “I like that band too, let’s smoke this”, LinkedIn is approaching someone at a party and handing them your business card. To look like you are a hard worker you need a LinkedIn profile, and you need to constantly send everyone who is in your email directory invitations to be a ‘connection.’ Like, all the time.  Never, ever stop.

So now you know how to do it and I have even run the numbers on all of these ‘life hacks’ (actually, that’s another thing – hard workers always say things like ‘life hack’ or ‘TED talk’) and in total, the amount of time you will spend doing all these things is ‘one day’. The rest of the time is yours. Except the LinkedIn stuff. That’s going to take up most of your life.

Trousers

The thing about trousers is there are really only two possible outcomes for me, trousers will either look passable on me, or they’ll look silly on me.  I have never worn a pair of pants and had anyone say “You look really good in those pants”. I have however had people say “Man, those pants are dicked up” or “Those pants look stupid you dick.”  The best I can hope for when I pant up is that I meet the relatively uninspiring bar of ‘not looking like a dick.’

The other problem is there is no way of knowing whether they’ll look “meh” or “shit” before purchasing them.  I mean, a lot of the time I try them on in the shop and I suppose this is the best defence against buying some fucked up trousers. The problem is this is so far from fool-proof that it is unsurprising I have bought loads of pants without trying them on first.  Firstly, no-one can think straight in a clothing shop.  There is something claustrophobic about all that fabric and the muffled screams of Chinese slave labour haunting the over-stuffed aisles.  I also lie when I said that no-one has ever said I looked good in pants; shop assistants have said that I look good in pants, and they are full of the brown sticky stuff.

I came to the realisation many years ago that I give off the air of a man who will lay down money for even the most vacuous compliment or stalest whiff of affection from a stranger.  I also know this about myself, have a rudimentary idea of how capitalism works in as much as it relates to shop assistants, and therefore I know to take anything they say with a grain of salt.  So I am without rudder or oar.

A further issue is that if I buy ill-fitting pants, I seldom buy them too small. No, I always grossly over-estimate how wide I am, or when buying trou I feel a subconscious need to factor in gaining ten kilos before I next need to trouser shop.  The problem with this is I’m tempted to make-do with the oversized sacks of fabric rather than return them, which I would have to do if they were too small.

jncoblog

There is actually a psy-trance party occurring inside the left leg. The right is strictly jungle.

There are a few things I miss about the nineties, none of them technology based, but a lot are clothing based. About the last time I got pants right was 2001 because there are few ways you can balls-up raver jeans; you are supposed to swim about inside them. In fact, the whole point was you could dance pretty vigorously inside the jeans without the jeans moving at all; a sort of tent for the legs which occasionally brushed against your calves absorbing perspiration and drugs.

Bad things happened in 2001 but nothing on a scale as destructive as what The Strokes did to pants.  The skinny jeans phenomena meant that men who were both vain and also lazy were faced with a stark choice; move with fashion and be forever pulling our crotch out of our crotch, or dance on into uncoolness, picking up cigarette butts and leaves with the bottom of our 50 inch hems.

I for one believe the Era of Big Trou needs to return, if for no other reason as it means pant-purchase will be less hit and miss and there will be one less reason for people to call me a dick.